exercise

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Four Ways to Keep Your Body in Shape

Guest blog by Alycia Gordan, a freelance writer loves to read and write articles related to health and lifestyle and sometime on health-tech as well. Alycia is a contributor at BookYogaRetreats.com.

Four Ways to Keep Your Body in Shape

Media, men and society require women to take care of themselves and look their best. We must invest in ourselves if we want to be beautiful, but you must remember to do it for yourself and not for anyone else.
There are quite a few healthy choices women can make to feel and look better, from eating habits and regular physical activity to yoga and a little bit of pampering now and then. Just remember to accept who you are, with all your strengths and flaws, because how you think about yourself is reflected into all areas of your life.

You are what you eat

The first thing you need to do to get in shape and stay fit is to be aware of what you eat. Whether you want a curvy figure or shed excess weight, food plays an important role in helping you achieve your fitness goals. The saying “you are what you eat” could not be any truer. You should begin by being completely aware of what you are feeding your body each day.

Start writing a journal or use online tools like myfitnesspal or sparkpeople. But you have to be completely honest and absolutely vigilant. That means that you should include that handful of chips you munched while putting away the groceries and the stick of gum that you popped into your mouth while waiting at the signal.

The second step is to start eating healthy. This means that the bulk of your diet should consist of leafy greens and healthy snacks such as fresh fruits, lean meats or a handful of dry fruits. You can certainly allow yourself a treat now and then, no need to swear off Belgium chocolate-chip ice cream for life, but you need to limit yourself to a scope rather than a pint.

Avoid fad diets, binge eating, and incorporate nutritious and wholesome foods that will give you the energy to perform your activities throughout the day. It doesn’t matter whether you have special dietary needs, healthy nutritious options are easily available.

There are no quick fixes

You know the sauna belt they keep showing on TV that you just have to put on and it will melt away the inches while you sleep? It doesn’t work. Nor do any creams or quick weight loss solutions. Or even if they do work, they come at a price – they can affect our health and can be heavy on the wallet.

Exercising is what truly works wonders. Not crazy marathons like spending three hours a day in the gym for a whole week, but short sessions that can easily be introduced into your daily routine until they become a habit. Sure, there are women who have the time, resources and motivation to spend hours in the gym every day, but for most of us average folk, it is simply not sustainable in the long run.

Basic, no-equipment workouts will get you started on your road to having a better body, and are manageable and sustainable. Squats, triceps dips, lunges, push-ups, wall-sits, calf raises, planks and abdominal crunches are some great exercises to do at home. Do three sets of each at 10 to 20 reps for each exercise and try to do them at least once or twice a week. If you want to make some real progress, your exercise program should also include at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise three to five times a week, with some stretching before and after to improve flexibility and help the body recover. You can also try brisk walking, jogging, swimming, cycling, rollerblading, gym classes or a game of tennis or squash.

Yoga

Practicing yoga can help you look more youthful and more radiant well into your old age, proving that the old saying “age is but a number” is indeed true. Regular yoga practice will not only help you achieve inner beauty but physical or outer beauty as well. The peace and wellbeing that fills your mind and spirit through yoga are reflected outward in the form of glowing skin and a lithe body.

Yoga helps lose excess weight and unwanted fat. It improves flexibility and helps maintain proper body posture, which is another essential element that makes you look more youthful. It also aids the absorption of nutrients at a cellular level, thus improving the body functions.

Best of all, practicing yoga regularly has been proven to considerably boost your mood, since it can greatly reduce stress levels, especially when incorporating pranayama or breathing exercises.

“Me” stuff

Pampering yourself and enjoying some “me time” are essential for your mental health and happiness. When you feel less stressed, you look better too. Most of us lead such hectic lives that we often forget to take care of ourselves and indulge a little. This can come in the form of a cup of soothing chamomile tea while we read a chick lit novel or a day spent at the spa, you name it!
Negative reviews at work, messy break-ups, gym and diet slip-ups are all discouraging. We need all the motivation we can get to stay on a healthy track rather than embarking on a marathon of pizza and chocolate.

Pampering yourself and being able to cheer yourself up through a new pair of dazzlingly silver high heels or a mani-pedi will make you look better, feel good and help pick yourself up and get back on your track.
Don’t just take our word for it, look at the stats! Researchers from Bishop’s University in Quebec who evaluated 15 studies involving more than 3,000 people are backing up our claims. The researchers found that those who were more self-compassionate—meaning they were kind to themselves when negative things happened rather than self-critical—also ate healthier, exercised more, slept better and stressed less than those who weren’t.
Doing something is always better than doing nothing. If you slipped up and had a doughnut on your way home from work, forgive yourself and go eat a salad. If you weren’t able to go to the gym today, do jumping jacks in the kitchen while the coffee brews.

If you have missed your yoga class, then a quick stretch before bed will help you sleep better. Keep in mind that your life is in your own hands and you have to make the right choices to stay healthy and happy.

Find Your Own Mould With Yoga

My knees felt super sore in Yin Yoga today. I looked around me and everyone else seemed fine, all folded over in Pigeon Pose as if their legs had no bones whatsoever. And I wanted to be like them. I thought, I should be able to do this, no problem, shouldn’t I? After all, I teach Yoga so how embarrassing would it be not to be able to perform a beautiful Eka Pada Rajakapotasana? What would that say about me? Am I a fake? An imposter at Yoga. I carried on moving through the sequence with my fellow yogis, while my knees told me something was wrong.

My Dad has recently had a knee replacement and is about to have op number two, and my uncle has alignment problems with his knees – once being told he could end up in a wheelchair. They have both learned the hard way how important it is to look after your knees. It seems I’m definitely a Daddy’s girl when it comes to knees – thanks Dad. Tight tendons with a tendency to lock painfully, and inconveniently, in cinemas, on car journeys and long-haul flights.

I think about this, and my frustration with my rebel knees melts into the mat. I feel a sense of softening and care fill its place. I lift up on to my forearms, to my palms, and ease the pressure with a sigh that could have been released directly from my grateful knees to my windpipe.

Nobody pays me any attention. Out of the corner of my eye, I notice the woman next to me lift onto her hands too. It feels good to find my own mould within this asana, away from those feelings of should and must, and the pull to look the same as everybody else.

It’s only as we unfurl into savasana that my mind settles upon the realisation that Pigeon Pose, plus my knees, taught me a valuable lesson today about how to live my life.

Are your knees trying to tell you something? Here is a modification for Pigeon to allow you to find your mould, your way.

Upside Down Pigeon

  • Begin lying on your back with one knee bent
  • Gently bring the other knee towards your chest and carefully place the ankle of the lifted leg over your knee
  • Reach your hands either side of the grounded leg and clasp the back of the thigh or front of the shin (you could use a small towel or strap to help with this)
  • Keep your head and shoulders on the ground
  • Slowly draw your grounded leg in towards your body until you feel a deep stretch in your floating hip and buttock.
  • Breathe deeply and focus on relaxing into the stretch
  • To get a deeper stretch, try to open your floating knee away from your body as you draw the other leg closer.

What I’ve Learned From Practising Yoga Imperfectly

I’m a born worrier, perfectionist and control freak. This is not something you’d expect to – or want to – hear from from a Yoga instructor, I’m sure. They say awareness is key, don’t they?..

Some of these characteristics can actually have a use. They make sure I never miss a flight – although my husband might argue about the necessity of turning up two hours ahead of check in. And they’re partly responsible for my avid, verging on nerdy, attention to perfecting postures during training for my Pilates and Yoga qualifications back in the day. These coping mechanisms have have kept me feeling safe when life has felt scary or out of control, but they have a pesky way of zipping in your deeper fears, while you’re focused on keeping the day to day gremlins out.

I came back to Yoga, experiencing burnout, as a way to quiet my anxious mind, boost my low mood and relax tense muscles. It did that, and so much more. Yoga taught me to let in some acceptance for myself, physically and emotionally. To smile when my tree pose is shaky and to notice, with kindness, if my chest is carrying a tell-tale ball of stress.

I recently took part in a beautiful Yoga class, led by Emma Peel at Yoga Rise in Peckham. Emma was guiding us through a wonderfully meditative Yin Yoga class and I found myself preoccupied with achieving the perfect Bridge pose. Were my hips completely symmetrical? Were my heels close enough to my sitting bones? I was completely missing this perfectly imperfect moment. Lost in my need to get it ‘right’, her words cut through, as if she could read the chatter of my monkey mind: “There is no perfect asana.” And she’s right. There is no perfect asana. There is only the shape that feels right for you in that moment. The asana that allows you to be really awake in your present experience.* The asana that is good enough – just as we are always good enough.

Ironically, just as the paradoxical theory of change would have it, this freedom to do things imperfectly on the Yoga mat, to let go of my worries about getting everything ‘right’, enabled me to develop my practice further than I could ever have imagined at the time. And it’s a lesson that has travelled with me off the mat and into other areas of my life. It helped me to grow past the causes of my burnout and recreate life, with a more adventurous spirit. A tight-fitting safety-jacket of perfectionism can be tough to unzip, but I can definitely tell you that wriggling out of it gives you so much more freedom of movement.

*as long as its safe (I’m still teacher after all!)

Calm an anxious mind and alleviate stress with Setu Bandha Sarvangasana (Bridge pose)

  • Lying on your back, bend both knees and place the feet flat on the floor hip width apart. Slide the arms alongside the body with the palms facing down.

  • Press the feet into the floor, inhale and lift the hips up, rolling the spine off the floor. Lightly squeeze the knees together to keep the knees hip width apart.

  • Press down into the arms and shoulders to lift the chest up. Engage the legs, buttocks and mula bandha to lift the hips higher.

  • Breathe and hold for 4-8 breaths.

  • To release: exhale and slowly roll the spine back to the floor.

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